The Mirena

For lack of a better way to describe this, let me tell you about the time my body tried to give birth to a Mirena. That’s right, I was suffering contractions for 2 months because of this apparant magical Mirena that was supposed to ‘solve’ my Endometriosis for the next 5 years. Winning, right?

I’ll start by explaining what a Mirena is. A Mirena is a hormonal IUD, which us a small device that is placed inside the uterus to prevent pregnancy. Or, my my case, prevent endometriosis from growing. Pictured below. You really wouldn’t think something so small and unassuming could cause so many issues!

I’d just gone through my 3rd surgery for Endometriosis, and while the surgeon was in there he’d inserted the Mirena, after explaining to me that this would be a great solution to keep my Endo at bay for the next 5 years.

After the surgery I felt a lot more ‘cramping’ than usual, but didn’t question that it could have been from anything other than the surgery.

A week after surgery I was in so much pain that the only relief I could get was through morphine and lying on my side with a pillow in between my legs. I called my surgeon the next day and got no answers or sympathy there. Everything looked fine in surgery, so everything therefore must be A-OK! 👍🏻

I continued on with life, all the while getting excruciating pain every single night, along with most days. I could be at work doubled over in pain, high as a kite on morphine and seriously considering pulling the damn thing out myself. I didn’t have the pain before this, so what else could be causing it? My gut was, quite literally, telling me that this ‘amazing’ device was the root to all my recent issues.

That being said, the Mirena is so effective for so many women. I just happen to be one of the unlucky ones because, as it turns out, you’re more likely to get issues and pain from it if you haven’t had kids, which I have not. My uterus was too tight and did not expect to have a sudden foreign object in there, and simply wanted it gone.

And so began the contractions, which is exactly what I was having for those two months. My uterus was trying to push it out, with no such luck. I was depressed both from the pain and from the hormones being pumped directly into my uterus. I was bleeding none stop. So I made the very easy decision to get it removed.

Doctors don’t warn you of these things. The likelihood of mood changes from the change in your hormones, the possible pain from a device if you haven’t had children. My GP, who is an awesome doctor, was actually the one to finally explain this to me when she removed the device.

I truly believe that the hormonal treatments women go through for conditions such as Endometriosis, need a lot more light shed on them. I truly believe that doctors should warn us of these possible downfalls, especially for hormonal treatments such as the Depo Provera injection, which once given, you cannot take back for 3 months. For me that ended with months of severe depression (which you can read about in my post ‘The Depo Darkness’.) Yes, I most definitely should have been warned about that!

And what about the rest of the population? What do you really know about the treatments for Endometriosis? Since awareness on the disease itself is pretty sad, I’m guessing not much at all. Surgery is the most well known, but there’s definitely a lot more to it. And NONE of it is pretty or easy.

So… let’s talk about it more. Start a conversation, tell people what you’re going through. Or better yet, ask another woman what they’re going through, ask them if they’re okay. Be open, be real. Because, at the end of the day, we’re not doing ourselves or these diseases any justice by hiding it.

2 thoughts on “The Mirena

  1. I had a similar reaction to the Mirena. Now I’m trying Kyleena, and things are similar. Unfortunately IUDs are the only form of contraception that work for me. Sending gentle hugs to you.

    Like

Leave a Reply to Laura Beames Cancel reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s